Broadview Passes FY 2021 Budget, Increases Funding For Flood Control Program

Saturday, May 23, 2020 || By Michael Romain || @maywoodnews 

During a special meeting on May 21, the Broadview Board of Trustees voted 5-2 to pass an ordinance adopting an annual budget for FY 2021. Each fiscal year runs from May 1 through April 30. The new budget, passed days after record rainfall caused flooding across the Chicago area, features $50,000 allocated toward the village’s Flood Control Assistance Program, Mayor Katrina Thompson said.

The village had previously budgeted $12,500 for the program and a board finance report showed that the village spent roughly $3,500 on the program in FY 2020.

As part of the program, the village offers to “offset a portion of the expense that a homeowner will incur to revise the house plumbing such that sewage cannot backflow into the house when the combined sewer is pressurized,” according to a document explaining the program.

Homeowners get to choose between four basic options, which include installing: an overhead sewer, a backflow prevention valve; a lift station, or a sump pump. You can find more information on the program here.

Disagreement over lobbyist line item 

Trustees Sherman Jones and Verina Horne voted against adopting the budget, drawing attention to an apparent discrepancy related to money paid to Al G. Ronan, the village’s lobbyist.

“What line item reflects our lobbyist, Al G. Ronan?” Horne asked. “For the financial audit, the number reflected, I believe it says “$48,000. The actual number for the audited finances exceeds $63,000.”

Your support is welcomed!

We are accepting donations so that we can continue bringing you quality reporting on the issues that matter most to you and your community!

Make A Donation

Mayor Thompson and Finance Director Timothy Hicks said that the extra money paid to Ronan was related to extra work done for a financial audit.

“We probably spent about $63,000 in the last fiscal year for the financial audit, but when we approved the audit, we had other things the auditors billed us for, so that we could be in compliance with the budget,” Thomspon said. “We may have spent $23,000 additional in the last fiscal budget … but this year, now that we’re in compliance with everything that they’ve asked us based on the management report, the actual amount for the auditor is $48,000. That’s what we contracted them for.”

“That’s what we’re contracted for, but the actual money spent exceeds $48,000,” Horne responded. “The actual money spent exceeds $60,000 [in total for the audited financials that took place in the last fiscal year], and that’s the number that should be reflected. And I want to call out that the budget reflects a $900,000-plus deficit.”

Trustee Jones argued that village officials should have provided more details about those additional services.

“You guys are talking about extra stuff without giving details about what the extras are that they did,” Jones said. “The prudent thing would be to leave it at $48,000 and reflect the additional expenditure, and make a note of the fact that the auditors did this work.”

Hicks responded that the “extra services they did were related to the audit,” adding that “there was a new governmental accounting standard we implemented [and] we needed an additional audit to be done. It was in addition to the financial audit … it’s all related.”

You can view the special budget meeting, along with supporting documents here.

Your support is welcomed!

We are accepting donations so that we can continue bringing you quality reporting on the issues that matter most to you and your community!

Make A Donation

Leave a Reply